Skip to main content

About your Search

20121226
20130103
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)
is adamant new gun laws are not the answer to stemming violence, down slightly from a year ago. on the other hand, a poll by "the washington post" and abc shows 52% of americans favor banning semiautomatic weapons, 59% support banning high-capacity clips. "outfront" tonight, roland and margaret. good to see you guys. margaret, i know that you grew up hunting, your dad took you hunting in colorado. one of the sea changes we've seen in the wake of this shooting is senators like joe manchin, mike warner, saying i've changed my mind, joe manchin saying, i've never hunted with more than three shells in a clip. why isn't this a conversation we can be having more broadly? and getting republican senators on board? >> i would also point you to the democratic governor of colorado in the wake of the aurora shootings also said, i'm not sure if an assault weapons ban would have stopped james woolsly in this mass certificate in colorado. an assault weapons ban wouldn't have stopped him. it's not just a republican or democratic issue. in 1994, the democrats took a huge political walloping -- do you like th
in the house so it's got no chance whatsoever of becoming law, end quote. that's what i said back on july 25th. the only reason we ever allowed that vote on that proposal is i said at that time was that we knew it didn't pass constitutional muster. and the democrats were really serious, they would proceed to a revenue bill that originated in the house as the constitution requires and as i called on them to do again last week. to repeat, the so-called nate bill is nothing more than a glorified sense of the senate resolution. so let's put that convenient talking point aside from here on out. last night i told the president we'd be happy to look at whatever he proposes but the truth is we're coming up against a hard deadline here and, as i said, this is a conversation we should have had months ago. and republicans aren't about to write a blank check or anything senate democrats put forward just because we find ourselves at the edge of the cliff. that wouldn't be fair to the american people. that having been said, we'll see what the president has to propose. members on both sides of the aisle will
, get it passed by the house and the senate and signed into law by the president. we're talking a long shot here. now, want to show you the players. president, there in the middle, democrats nancy pelosi and harry reid. republicans mitch mcconnell and john boehner. those four members of congress are expected to make the drive from the capital, which you see on the right, down pennsylvania avenue, to the white house, there on the left. and we expect them to enter through a side door on the west side of the mansion. that's the entrance right there. and they'll meet with the president. in the oval office. beginning, we're told, at 3:00 p.m., less than one hour from now. and just four days ahead of the so-called fiscal cliff. so a very big moment in the nation's capital. and to walk us through what might happen we turn to jessica yellin, a chief white house correspondent. jessica, we said up front, it is a long shot, give us a best case scenario. >> reporter: the best case scenario would be that all the leaders walk out of this meeting and say they have a deal. the two senators say they ca
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5 (some duplicates have been removed)